The Tree That Owns Itself

The Tree That Owns Itself


The Tree That Owns Itself

One of the things that makes my hometown of Athens, Georgia unique is the Tree That Owns Itself. Located at the corner of Finley and Dearing Streets the original owner of the land so loved  the Tree he left it the land it stood upon in his will. I stopped by on the way home today and took some pictures.

Finley Street is also the last cobble stone street left in Athens.

The Tree That Owns Itself
The Tree That Owns Itself

There is an old saying in the South, “Don’t stand in the sun when you can sit in the shade.”

croquis 8

Croquis 2, get centered, get quiet, get focused…acrylic and ink


Croquis 2, get centered, get quiet, get focused…acrylic and ink

These croquis are from week 117 on the Croquis Cafe. The featured image above is a 5 minute work in a mix of ink and acrylic. The black and white drawings in the composite below are 2 minute pieces and the colored ones are 1 minute works.

I’m not sure how I want to use the Croquis Cafe. I think doing a couple or three sessions a week will be a good start.

“I never draw except with brush and paint…”

(Claude Monet)

Croquis 2 composite acrylic and ink
Croquis 2 composite
acrylic and ink

“…in painting the great painters never lose sight of the fact that it is paint with which they are expressing themselves.”

Harold Speed

 

croquis 1a comp

Croquis 1, get centered, get quiet, get focused…acrylic


Croquis 1, get centered, get quiet, get focused…acrylic

A croquis comes from the French like many of our modern artistic terms and can only be roughly translated into English as a quick or rapid drawing. It’s usually done as a preliminary study or warm up to a session with longer poses. Me, I like them because I find a croquis to be fun and the most direct way of working. There is spontaneity of expression in a croquis I enjoy, it’s like the boogie, it’s in me and it’s got to come out. I have come to find that there is no censorship in expression in the rapid choices that must be made to do these in a timely manner. When I over think my work it becomes overworked. That is a serious concern for me and something I try to address in every work I do. Setting a time limit to a piece is an excellent way to force to stop before it goes to far.

These three brush drawings are taken from the Croquis Cafe week 119 with Heather as the model. They are all 1 minute drawings and I like the momentum you build up drawing this way. I plan on continuing with this  session and moving on the next poses. They provide you with 1 minute, 2 minute and 5 minute poses. I like to do a 2 0r 3 drawings of each poses before moving on to the next. It’s like having a life drawing session right in your studio any time you want one. They also have a nice archive of still photos to draw from and they’ve just added a new group of hands that I’m very excited about.

Croquis 1, a triptych 24x11, acrylic
Croquis 1, a triptych
24×11, acrylic

“…in painting the great painters never lose sight of the fact that it is paint with which they are expressing themselves.”

Harold Speed

heads-x19b

drawing heads 9, you have to feel the unseen…acrylic and ink


drawing heads 9, you have to feel the unseen…acrylic and ink

Drawing heads 9 developed into a full blown painting right before my eyes which is where all my paintings develope and I had a great deal of fun working it up.

I feel the need for some figure drawing so it’s time once again to give a shout out to the folks at Croquis Cafe. None of the drawing of heads I’ve posted lately have been done from this wonderful resource but the work I’ll be posting the rest of this week will. If you have not visited these folks do so very soon.

“…in painting the great painters never lose sight of the fact that it is paint with which they are expressing themselves.”

Harold Speed

drawing heads 9, you must feel the unseen 8x11, acrylic and ink
drawing heads 9, you must feel the unseen 8×11, acrylic and ink

heads x11b

drawing heads 6, you have to feel the unseen…mixed media


drawing heads 6, you have to feel the unseen…acrylic and ink

With drawing heads 6, I am starting to develop a style that and adding a touch of color that allows me a great deal of freedom in expression. Another thing I’m trying with this group of brush drawings is to use a mixture of India ink and black acrylic. This mixture is something I used several years ago when I was preparing the transparencies used for creating silk screens. The acrylic adds more body to the ink and the ink adds more depth to the acrylic. Once again I wanted to work on saturated paper but at this point in the process I think it’s way to early. In the second row a bit of color was added for spice.

drawing heads 6, you have to feel the unseen 16x11, acrylic and ink
drawing heads 6, you have to feel the unseen
16×11, acrylic and ink

“Impatience has probably been a bigger stumbling block in the way of real ability than anything else”

Andrew Loomis’s Drawing Heads and Hands.

10 Ways to Revive Your Studio Spirit When You’ve Hit a Brick Wall


richardhustonart:

This Post has a lot of good ideas

Originally posted on notes to the milkman:

Every day a newsletter pops into my email box from ArtistsNetwork. Now they are a commercial organisation but nevertheless I find their blogs and information very interesting if you ignore the underlying ‘buy this’  message. Today I read this blog by Chris Cozen  which I felt discusses a common problem, not only with acrylic painting but with all artistic endeavours. You may need to modify some ideas, but there must be similar approaches in your line.

Acrylic painting techniques with Chris Cozen

“Have you ever hit a brick wall in your studio practice? One day I realized that I was starting every painting in the same way. It stopped me right where I stood. I recognized then that I needed to shake things up in order to start fresh. When I feel like I’m in a rut, the first thing I do is grab a new acrylic painting product or one I haven’t used in…

View original 385 more words

Celebrating Wilderness Through Art!


richardhustonart:

Got to get back to the garden…

Originally posted on "Life of a Daily Painter":

Phyllis Northup (right) explains sketching techniques
Phyllis Northup (right) explains sketching techniques
Betty Gatewood, Park Ranger, explains the schedule
Betty Gatewood, Park Ranger, explains the schedule
Hiking to our Sketch Location
Hiking to our Sketch Location
Participants in Big Meadows
Participants in Big Meadows

Shen Sketch 10

Quick sketches done by seminar participants
Quick sketches done by seminar participants
Big Meadow-Shenandoah National Park
Big Meadow-Shenandoah National Park

The “Celebrating Wilderness Through Art” Seminar that I attended yesterday was delightful!

The group of about 25 met at Byrd Visitor Center (milepost 51) and were warmly welcomed by the staff of Shenandoah National Park as well as by our seminar leaders Betty Gatewood and Phyllis Northup.

We were given an overview of the Wilderness Act which is celebrating its 50th Anniversary.  The seminar was offered as part of that celebration.

The focus of the day was on the “How and Why of Journaling Nature”.  The leaders did an excellent job in such a short time to focus on seeing and sketching as well as recording what we see, feel, hear and smell as we view nature.

We…

View original 50 more words

Blanchland Village


richardhustonart:

There’s a wonderful quality to the light in this painting

Originally posted on Richard Hart-Jackson Art:

20140707-094252-34972261.jpg
This lovely village in the Derwent Valley, Northumberland, is set in open countryside and moorland. Much of it was built in the 17th Century out of stone from the ruins of its 12th Century Abbey. In recent years it has been used as the setting of several films and TV productions.
My painting in acrylic.

View original

drawing heads 8, you have to feel the unseen acrylic and ink

drawing heads 8, you have to feel the unseen…mixed media


drawing heads 8, you have to feel the unseen…acrylic and ink

Drawing heads 8 is about seeing the planes of the head. There is a fine line of balance between the carved look of planes and the rounded and curved surface we normally perceive  looking at the people we meet. When we look we quite often don’t see.

“Artist’s have found that by squaring the the planes, softening them only enough to relieve that broken stone effect, they achieve solidity and vitality without going to extremes.”

Andrew Loomis

 It is a great deal of fun for me to be on this journey of discovery. I’m learning new ideas and ways to see the head as well as it’s structure; as well as, draw with the brush. Another important lesson I’ve learned is in order for me to draw well with the brush I need to draw larger.

drawing heads 8, you must feel the unseen acrylic and ink
drawing heads 8, you must feel the unseen
acrylic and ink

“Impatience has probably been a bigger stumbling block in the way of real ability than anything else”

 Andrew Loomis

“…in painting the great painters never lose sight of the fact that it is paint with which they are expressing themselves.”

Harold Speed

heads x13b1

drawing heads 7, you have to feel the unseen…acrylic and ink


drawing heads 7, you have to feel the unseen…acrylic and India ink

I have started to simplify with drawing heads 7 and work with a Simmons #16 flat instead of the small script brushes I have been using. The first 2 drawings were done with  #s 0 and 3 script; as well as, a #3 rigger.

“…in painting the great painters never lose sight of the fact that it is paint with which they are expressing themselves.”

“…When a brush full of paint is in your hands. The reducing of a complicated appearance to a few simple masses is the first necessity of the painter”

Harold Speed
The Practice and Science of Drawing; 1913
Seeley,Service and Company Limited; London

drawing heads 7, you have to feel the unseen 17 x11, acrylic and India ink
drawing heads 7, you have to feel the unseen
17 x11, acrylic and India ink

“Impatience has probably been a bigger stumbling block in the way of real ability than anything else”

Andrew Loomis

Drawing heads 5 composite acrylic

Drawing heads 5, you must feel the unseen side…acrylic


Drawing heads 5, you must feel the unseen side…acrylic

With Drawing heads 5 I am continuing to enjoy drawing with the brush. I find it much more expressive than any other way of working. It is not the first explorations in brush drawing but now my commitment is much stronger.

“Drawing is a frame of mind, a loving embrace if you will.”
(Susan Avishai)

“I await joyous surprises while working, an awakening of the materials that I work with and that my spirit develops.”
(Odilon Redon)

Drawing heads 5 composite acrylic
Drawing heads 5 composite
acrylic

Some more related links

Ink wash on saturated paper; West Washington …In the crowd 8

Ink Wash; Crowd 4

“Impatience has probably been a bigger stumbling block in the way of real ability than anything else”

Andrew Loomis

Drawing heads 4a, you have to feel the unseen side 8x11, acrylic

Drawing heads 4, you have to feel the unseen side


Drawing heads 4, you have to feel the unseen side…aqueous acrylic

Drawing heads 4 is continuing my study of Andrew Loomis’ Drawing Heads and Hands. I’m also doing a bit of research in other books I have found on the internet as free downloads. Most of these have been PDFs preserved by such sites as the Gutenberg Project.

One of these is the interesting and to me captivating book The Practice and Science of Drawing. I look forward to reading even more of this book.

“Art probably owes more to form for its range of expression than to colour.”

“To have a clear idea of what it is you wish to do, is the first necessity of any successful performance.”

“By drawing is here meant the expression of form upon a plane surface.”

Harold Speed
The Practice and Science of Drawing; 1913
Seeley,Service and Company Limited; London

I am first and foremost a painter and as Cezanne said, “When you paint, you draw…” It didn’t surprise me when I grabbed my #3 liner and started to draw with the brush. It really is a natural conclusion if your goal is to improve your draughtsmanship in order to improve your painting. One of the things I’m most interested in exploring is becoming much more direct in my approach to painting and I think working this way will help accomplish it. The direct drawing in paint just feels more natural to me and as Kimon Nicolaides wrote, “There is only way to draw, the natural way.”

There is another advantage to drawing with the brush for me. Since I grip a brush much more lightly than I ever have gripped a pencil and paint with my entire arm, shoulder, elbow, wrist and hand there is less stress placed on my arthritic wrist. I keep reminding myself, if Matisse can continue to draw and paint while dying of cancer, a stiff and a painful wrist ain’t gonna turn me around.

Today is Marc Chagall’s Birthday…Join the celebration!

Drawing heads 4, you have to feel the unseen side 8x11, acrylic
Drawing heads 4, you have to feel the unseen side
8×11, acrylic

“Impatience has probably been a bigger stumbling block in the way of real ability than anything else”

Andrew Loomis

Living, painting and drawing daily From the Edge of Normaltown

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